Status

W6PSPO Meeting Notes – March 19, 2019

March 19, 2019
Payne Elementary School, 1445 C Street, SE, 6:30 p.m. – 8 p.m.

  1. At-Risk Funding Overview – Betsy Wolf, Amidon-Bowen parent [See presentation]
  • Inequity in school funding in DCPS
    • DCPS funds look like they are equitably allocated across schools in that schools serving greater % at-risk get more funds. But schools serving greater % at-risk also serve more students with IEPs. Taking out special education funding, no longer see equitable funding across schools in DCPS.
    • Why not? Where is at-risk money going? It’s going to cover core general and special education positions in many cases. At-risk money is not truly supplementing the base funding.
  • Achievement gaps
    • DC has a large achievement gap because it has large income inequality. Nationwide, achievement gaps are the highest in places with the greatest income inequality.
  • Interventions to target achievement gaps
    • To target the achievement gap, you need to supplement instruction for the lowest performing students. Small-group instruction and tutoring have been shown to be the most impactful interventions in education research. But schools don’t have enough extra money to fund positions like reading specialists across the board.
  1. Open discussion with Chancellor Ferebee
  • Budget: trying to address decline in enrollment w/in schools in East DC vs
    https://twitter.com/VJablow/status/1108737079670964224

    Community response to Chancellor Ferebee’s characterization of FY20 budget

    overcrowding in West DC 

  • Pointed to Council legislation re: stabilization to support schools in enrollment decline (cap at 5% of resources)
  • Confusion remains around DCPS budget/follow the $?
    • Start at per pupil allocation, then add $
    • Comprehensive staffing model adds to ‘blur’
  • Re: recommended interventions to target achievement gaps (like small group/reading specialist):
    • School based decision today; do we create a model that is mandatory
    • Influence of great teachers/school leaders is not necc equitable
    • Believes in autonomy, but also in sharing with schools research-based strategies to inform their staffing and budgeting decisions.
  • Cross-sector planning (W6PSPO → community members; CF: Chancellor Ferebee)
    • W6PSPO: Proliferation of charters and impact on overall resources. CF: Approaching coordination carefully;
    • W6PSPO: Need planning and stability w/ policy around it; Need Chancellor to be ‘cheerleader’ for DCPS
  • Inequity w/in schools
    • W6PSPO: Resources/visibility w/in schools are focused on early childhood families (engagement is higher from early childhood families), but schools are being judged by test scores at 4/5th grades
  • Teacher Turnover
    • W6PSPO: When classrooms are without a teacher for extended period of time, is there an accountability model parents can follow up with beyond the principal? (Principals are not always responsive nor give priority to staffing gaps). CF: Instructional superintendents are first point of contact.
  • School Leadership:
    • W6PSPO:What can the DCPS do to strengthen teacher/principal retention? CF: Exploring multi-year principal contract (today, principal contracts are renewed -or not- annually);  Committed to engaging w/ WTU on IMPACT; Solve for great leadership
    • W6PSPO: Principals are able to use IMPACT to evaluate and retaliate against teachers; teachers don’t have a meaningful way to give feedback on principals. CF: DCPS tracks data about whether teachers return. Understand that there are independent evaluators under IMPACT. W6PSPO: Correction – WTU did not want evaluators who didn’t know them, the school community and requested peer evaluators. Suggest DCPS pursue meaningful feedback from teachers when evaluating principal’s performance;
  • Modernizations/Community Engagement:
    • W6PSPO: Modernization/PACE act – suggestion to engage parents who have gone through SIT process to get a view ‘under the hood’ how policy plays out in practice.
    • W6PSPO: What can we hold DCPS accountable for vis a vis lead in drinking water? CF: DGS/DCPS committed to communicating at each step of the process.
    • W6PSPO:  DCPS central office staff need to spend more time in the schools, understand what happens on the ground
  1. Open discussion with Jessica Sutter, SBOE W6
  • State board voting on priorities Weds, March 20
    • STAR report/dc school report card
    • OSSE survey on report cards: 3 year cycle for changes, except High school growth model
    • High school graduation requirements/Credit recovery
    • Committees
      • Teacher/leader turnover
        • Teacher/leader working group 1st friday of month 10 am
      • Research, 3rd Friday
      • Social studies 3rd Friday
      • Rich curriculum 3rd Friday
  • Ward 6 DCSBOE Rep Proposed Priorities (JS = Jessica Sutter; W6PSPO → Community members)
    • OSSE STAR Rating Feedback: JS: Will use OSSE Survey and SBOE surveys as starting point for community level discussions. How best to do the OSSE/STAR feedback for Ward 6?  W6PSPO: Best at school level; better opportunity for collecting feedback, esp from teachers. Focus group model.
    • Middle/HS paths: Ward 6 families have expressed frustration around middle and high school options. (in particular lack of strategy around dual language continuation) Middle and high schools (mostly parents from dual language programs have reached out and are dissatisfied w/ feeder options). Looking at options for bringing solutions for Tyler and Stokes communities. W6PSPO: Should start conversation with DCPS; feeders patterns would be affected.
    • Advocacy Coordination Across Sectors: JS: should W6PSPO broaden advocacy efforts to also include charters? W6PSPO: overall, priorities are not necessarily always aligned. Currently, W6PSPO has hands full w/stabilizing feeder patterns, DCPS budget, technology, etc. W6PSPO always open to coordinating with charter schools when it makes sense on specific issues common to all schools.  Some common areas might include standardizing grades (like grade middle schools start, e.g., 5th for charters, 6th for DCPS; SpEd student imbalance (neighborhood schools and open enrollment schools bear the brunt of SpEd-heavy communities, while charter and selective DCPS schools have low SpEd population).

4. Wilson Building Visits – Danica Petroshius –

  •  Friday, March 23 10AM-4PM. Danica to follow up via email to W6PSPO


5. CHPSPO’s new name →
W6PSPO 

 

Next CHPSPO Meeting: April 23, 2019 (Note:  4th Thursday due to spring break)

Upcoming Events

Budget Oversight Hearings – Register to testify here–> http://bit.do/educationhearings

  • March 27      State Board of Education, Office of the Ombudsman for Public Education, and the Office of the Student Advocate
  • March 29      DCPS (Public Witnesses Only)
  • April 4          Public Charter School Board
  • April 9          Office of the State Superintendent of Education
  • April 25        Deputy Mayor for Education

March 25      Capitol Hill Community Foundation Spring Grants deadline

March 29      Ferebee Friday, Pretzel Bakery, 8 – 9:30 am

Visit W6PSPO on the web at http://chpspo.org

Status

CHPSPO Meeting Notes – December 2018 and January 2019

Miner Elementary School – 601 15th Street, NE

January 15, 2019 – 6:30 p.m. – 8 p.m.

 

  1. 2019 Performance Oversight and Budget Hearings, Laura Marks and Anne Phelps
  • Budget Presentation. See presentation.
  • Important to make priorities heard by Mayor before it is transmitted to Council (March 20), as agencies are formulating their budget now. Citizen priorities are captured in decisions.
    • Email Jenny Reed jennifer.reed@dc.gov (Director, Office of Budget & Performance) , John Falcicchio john.falcicchio@dc.gov (Mayor’s Chief of Staff), (see more on slide 19).
    • Look up Mayor’s schedule (https://mayor.dc.gov/newsroom)
    • Only chairman has scope to re-fund/fund priorities. Typically, this cannot be done at committee level (committees develop recs).
    • Attend hearings: http://www.davidgrosso.org/education-committee/
    • Education-related committee changes:
      • Grosso is chair; Mendelson somewhat co-chairing. Possibly joint hearings for performance and budget – Education; DCPS, DME, OSSE, Library
    • DGS now under Robert White
  • Timing
    • Once Mayor’s budget is transmitted to Council, it will be published on https://cfo.dc.gov/ (circa March 20)
    • DCPS has slightly different budget timeline; Council does not engage in school-level budget recommendations on Operating budget. However, Council has some discretion on Capital Budget. (See slide 13)
  • Highlights
    • Of 14.6B, 8B are used locally; education is second largest allocation (18.2%),
    • Of 1.67B Capital budget, DCPS 20.9%
    • DC Public Library – many opportunities for collaboration w/ DCPS, and libraries need adequate budget support
  • Requests:

2. FoodPrints Funding, Jennifer Mampara

  • In 13 schools in all wards but ward 3. In Ward 6: Watkins, Peabody, LT, SWS, Tyler – http://freshfarm.org/foodprints.html
  • Funded by OSSE, PTAs, Federal Grants, Private Donors, Indiv School Budgets through contract by DCPS Office of School Nutrition Svcs
  • At the end of the school year, DCPS contract funds will run out, OSSE grants are for kickstarting (not ongoing) programs
  • Requesting from DC Gov, fund existing programs,
  • Letters to Mayor, DME, DCPS advocating for food education programming in schools. High demand
  • Language to include in testimony. See language.

3. Technology Advocacy, Grace Hu

4. Wilson Building Visits, Danica Petroshius

  • Early to mid Feb; refresh on CHPSPO; set agenda
    • ~10 per day + twitter amplifying
  • CHPSPO Strategic Plan
  • STAR Rating

5. Chancellor Selection, Group Discussion

6. It’s time for CHPSPO to change its name (come with ideas for names, new logo, etc.), Group Discussion. Suggestions:

  • Ward 6 Education Council
  • Ward Six Public Schools Parent Organization (WSPSPO)
  • Capital Helpers for Public Schools and Parent Organizing (CHPSPO)
  • Creative Help for Public School and Parent Organizing (CHPSPO)

Next CHPSPO Meeting: February 12, 2019

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Capitol Hill Montessori@Logan – 215 G Street, NE, December 18, 2018

December 18, 2018 – 6:30 p.m. – 8 p.m.

  1. Safe Passages Program, Office of the Student Advocate
  • Who is Office of the Student Advocate? See presentation
  • 50% of Ward 6 Requests for Assistance to Student Advocate are re: Safe Passage
  • Parent and Family Go To Guide. See guide.
  • Safe Passage Toolkit
  • Potomac Ave (MPD)
    • MPD Daily juvenile conference call
    • MPD Detail at L’enfant plaza
    • MPD Daily usually start at stadium and l’enfant and follow groups
    • Casual/plain clothes anti-terrorism which focus on Eastern Market and Potomac Ave
    • Fights/violence are priority; fights can turn into robberies
  • MPD Resource Officers focusing on youth advisory council ; suggestions
    • School leaders and school staff present at ‘hot points’ can be a deterrent
    • Lighting the path; stand out on the street between 3-5
    • Advocate for heads of school to join the calls
  • Next Steps: Fulcrum host DME, Office of Student Advocate, MPD, and Potomac Ave community planning around Safe Passage. Contact Tom Kavanaugh tom@fulcrumpg.com

2. LSAT Coordination, Steve Bowen, Payne LSAT

  • What is the best way to coordinate across LSAT members?
    • Mailing list
    • LSAT training in May; alongside with Council budget presentation

3. School Report Card reactions, Group Discussion – Deferred

4. CHPSPO 2019 Strategic Plan Action Items, Danica Petroshius and Suzanne Wells – Deferred

5. Is it time for CHPSPO to change its name?, Group Discussion – Deferred

Next CHPSPO Meeting: January 15, 2019

CHPSPO Meeting Notes – December 15, 2015

CHPSPO Meeting Notes

Brent Elementary

December 15, 2015

 

1) 3-8th grade PARCC results presentation by Bonnie O’Keefe OSSE

  • Reviewed PARCC Results and handed out one-page guides to the new assessment –> PARCC one pager.
  • New student reports have been designed for DC – mockups and a parent guide are available on the OSSE website in 6 different languages. Schools will get the individual student test results this week. Each school has the option for when and how to distribute those scores to parents. Parents will receive a copy of the parent guide with their child’s report card.
  • PARCC v DC CAS comparison: DC CAS had composition and reading test, PARCC has only one English Language Arts (ELA) test. General level of rigor is much higher on the PARCC assessment.
  • Because this is the first year of PARCC, there were no new identifications to put schools into focus or priority status (i.e. not meeting their goals). However, if schools already in focus or priority status made progress on certain criteria on the 2015 test, they can be removed from that status.
  • The new Every Student Succeed Act (ESSA) – the rewrite of the No Child Left Behind Law and the law that will supersede current state waivers – will change state accountability systems. There is more flexibility for states, but some of the rules have changed to in what is required for states in their accountability systems. For example, how OSSE will use test scores will change. But the use of PARCC as the test and the use of the new report cards will not change. Under the new law, OSSE will have 18 months to finalize a new plan with the U.S. Department of Education.
  • Joe Weedon: The State Board of Education will have to approve the OSSE plan and there will be public hearings on what the new accountability plan throughout the Spring and Summer of 2016. The Board is particularly interested in equitable access issues and competency based education.
  • PARCC defines college and career readiness as the 70% likelihood a student would earn credit in an entry level college course (scoring a level 4 or 5 in PARCC).

2) DCPS Budget 101 Presentation (Laura Marks and Anne Phelps from Councilman Allen’s office and Joe Weedon from SBOE)

  • Overview of Budget Process
    • Capital budget and operating budget are the two big pots of funding. You can’t transfer money between them. School modernizations are in the capital budget. Everything in the school walls comes from the operating budget.
    • Budget is about $12 billion per year for the city (federal, private and local funding). Of that, $7 billion is from local funds that can be moved around. 27% of those funds are dedicated for education – the highest percentage of the local budget.
  • Current 2016 DCPS Budget (compared to 2015)
    • No increase in uniform per-pupil funding formula.
    • Capital budget reduced by $330 million over 5 years out of the education sector; Ward 6 school modernizations cut $125 million (though they agree to the current year plus 5 years out when they do capital budgets, they can reassess and change them each year). Overall, the DC 6-year capital plan is $1.3 billion.
    • “At-Risk” Funds are being distributed on need. The original intent is for those funds to follow the at-risk students, but that hasn’t happened in past. This budget makes the effort to get the funds into the schools that qualify. Councilman Allen and others are now interested in knowing whether the funds are being used to supplement not supplant funds in individual schools. Council will continue to look into that through oversight.
    • Extended Day funding is increased, aftercare funding reduced. Councilman Allen is interested in learning more about the effects extended day has on aftercare offerings and how effectively the extended day funding is being used at schools.
  • FY2017 Budget Process has Kicked Off
    • November – normally the Chancellor outlines her priorities, but this year we are still waiting to hear what DCPS will identify as their big funding priorities
    • Now: Parent and community survey online – place to weigh in on budget priorities (November-December) engagedcps.org
    • November: DCPS held citywide LSAT planning and training meetings (three done)
    • Now: Chancellor team in process of identifying school enrollment targets and a modernization plan
    • Feb-March: School, LSAT and DCPS work to finalize school budgets
    • In the first 2 weeks of March, DCPS has to wrap up the back and forth with the schools to submit to Mayor’s budget team
    • Date to submit Mayor’s proposed budget to Council is March 24th.
  • Council Role
    • Once the Mayor submits the budget to Council, Council has 56 days (by law in the Home Rule Act) to hold hearings, develop priorities, develop a committee chairman’s budget, then the full committee amend and vote on the committee budget
    • Performance oversight hearings: February 4 – March 11, 2016
    • Budget oversight hearings: April 6-28, 2016
    • May 4 and 5 committee budgets go to the committee of a whole to reconcile all the budgets
    • May 17th there is a reconciliation vote – vote on the entire budget package
    • In the Operating Budget, Council cannot amend the DCPS operating budget easily or at all because even if they have a directive put in to change the operating budget, the Chancellor can reprogram that money. DCPS is a unique circumstance. For example, in the library budget, Council can direct more of the funds. But Council can move around priorities in the Capital budget.

What can parents do:

  • Advocates: Now is the time to focus on advocating at the school level for the right operating budget for the school – with the Principal, LSAT, and parents – to work with DCPS to achieve priorities. For issues across schools, need to advocate with the Mayor and Chancellor on city-wide programmatic funds.
  • Advocates: On Capital side of the budget there is less ability to manipulate the budget than before, but still some ability. But there needs to be coordinated prioritization particularly in Ward 6.
  • Now is the time to start pushing priorities.
  • Two big asks could be: more money in school modernization/capital budget overall, and increases in the per pupil funding formula.
  • DCPS does not fund schools on a per student basis. They fund on a staffing model (see below).
  • Operating Budget Issues – Where can we influence DCPS funding?
    • Key is enrollment projections. If 300, 350, 400 there are different staffing models.
    • Still elements of the budget where the principal and LSAT can advocate within the DCPS process.
    • LSAT has a “School Budget Development Guide” put out by DCPS that can be a tool to help. It often lays out elements that DCPS is changing in terms of priorities and what is changing in terms of school and district funding and thresholds. The FY17 version is not yet available of this guide. Parents need to ask principals for this guide. They may need to ask DCPS for it.

What can parents and advocates do?

  • Ask your principal: what is the projected enrollment number from DCPS (now is when they are asking for adjustments). By Dec 18th the enrollment numbers will be final.
  • Ask principal/LSAT for the latest “School Budget Development Guide” and read and understand the parameters for how DCPS will build the draft school budgets this year.
  • Work with principal and LSAT – now – to align school budget to community priorities. Discuss what trade-offs have to be made and how collectively the community can work on priorities.

3) CHPSPO School Modernization Advocacy

  • CHPSPO feels we need more priority on the school modernization budget overall – arguing that overall and Ward 6 need more funding for the capital budget. Funds should be restored and increased overall.
  • CHPSPO will start working with the Deputy Mayor and Mayor and make an effort to increase the capital school budget overall and for Ward 6 in particular.

Next CHPSPO Meeting:  January 19, 2016

Upcoming Events  (inclement weather may impact schedules – please confirm open house dates w/ individual schools -see http://www.myschooldc.org/calendar/ )

January 5 – Amidon-Bowen Open House, 9:30-10:30 am

January 7 – Ludlow-Taylor Open House, 9:30-10:30 am

January 8 – Jefferson Academy Open House, 9:30-11:00 am

January 11 – Maury ES Open House, 9:00-10:30 am

January 11 – Brent ES Open House, 9:00-10:30 am

January 11 – Capitol Hill Montessori at Logan EC Open House, 6:00-7:00 pm

January 11 – Maury ES Open House, 6:15-7:45 pm

January 14 – J.O. Wilson ES Open House, 9:30-11:00 am

January 14 – Miner ES Open House, 9:30-10:30 am

January 14 – Eastern HS Open House, 5:30-7:00 pm

January 14 – Jefferson Academy MS Open House, 6:00-7:00 pm

January 14 – School Within a School @ Goding Open House, 6:00-7:30 pm

January 15 – Tyler ES Open House, 6:00-7:00 pm

January 19 – Walker-Jones EC Open House, 9:00-10:30 am

January 19 – Tyler ES Open House, 9:30-10:30 am

January 21 – J.O. Wilson Summer Camp Fair, 6 – 8 pm

For Immediate Release: Baked Goodies to Support DCPS Libraries – July 11

Photo Credit: Caroline Angelo

  FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

  Wednesday, July 11

  Contact:  CHPSPO, chpspo@gmail.com, Bella Dinh-Zarr (dinhzarr@dinhzarr.org) or Robert Zarr (RLZARR@yahoo.com)

 

 Parents and Students Hold Baked Goodies Event to Support DCPS Libraries 

 

Washington, DC- On Wednesday, July 11, 2012, parents and students from across Washington, DC will be raising funds to support funding school librarians in District of Columbia Public Schools (DCPS).

Baked Goodies to Support DCPS Libraries
Wednesday, July 11, 8:00 – 11:00 a.m.
Wilson Building, 1350 Pennsylvania Ave NW (Penn side)

DCPS says they can’t support their school libraries, so let’s help them.  Bring a dozen baked goods with you to the Wilson Building on Wednesday morning (July 11).  All donations will be donated to Kaya Henderson for the school libraries.  It’s a great way to involve your children…they can help you bake, practice their math as they count money on that morning, and learn some civics about what it takes to be an involved citizen in our world.

We want DCPS to:

–      Budget a librarian in every school (at least ½ time in smaller schools).

–      Move librarian position to core staff category (not flexible/optional).

–      Provide a “per student” budget allocation for books/materials.

–      Make their budget more transparent!

What You Can Do:

–      Come to the Wilson Building on July 11th

–      Contribute a baked good (see below)

–      Tell the media (press release available)

–      Tell the Mayor and Chancellor!

More details here –> Librarians Flyer 7-11-12.

——————–

Photo Credit: Margaret Holwill (H St DC)

UPDATE – Thanks for your support on the 4th of July bake sale. We raised $90 in donations and sales.  To date, $346 has been raised in support of DCPS libraries… Have we managed to raise awareness? You decide. Tell the Chancellor and Mayor you support DCPS Libraries!

Tweet #SaveSchoolLibraries

For Immediate Release: Bake Sale to Support DCPS Libraries

  FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

  Thursday, June 14

  Contact:  CHPSPO, chpspo@gmail.com,

 

  Parents and Students Hold Bake Sale to Support DCPS Libraries 

 

Washington, DC- On Friday, June 15, 2012, parents and students from across Washington, DC will be raising funds to support funding school librarians in District of Columbia Public Schools (DCPS).

Bake Sale to Support DCPS Libraries
Friday, June 15, 7:30 – 10:30 a.m.
DCPS, 1200 First Street, NE

DCPS says they can’t support their school libraries, so let’s help them.  Bring a dozen baked goods with you to the DCPS headquarters on Friday morning.  All proceeds will be donated to Kaya Henderson for the school libraries.  It’s a great way to involve your children…they can help you bake, practice their math as they give out change on Friday morning, and learn some civics about what it takes to be an involved citizen in our world.

Tweet #SaveSchoolLibraries

For Immediate Release: Parents and Students Protest DCPS Cuts to Libraries

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Sunday, May 20, 2012

 

Contact:  Peter MacPherson, pmacpher@aol.com, 202-315-8155

 

Parents and Students Protest DCPS Cuts to Libraries

 

Washington, DC- On Monday, May 21, 2012, parents and students from across Washington, DC will be protesting school librarian cuts by the District of Columbia Public Schools (DCPS) in the FY13 budget.  The event will take place in front of DCPS headquarters at 1200 First Street, N.E. between 1pm and 6pm.

In the FY13 DCPS budget, important changes were made that dramatically impact school libraries:

 

  • No funding was provided for the school librarian position for schools with 299 or fewer students.
  • Funding was provided for the school librarian position for schools with an enrollment of 300 or more students, BUT:
    • The school librarian position was moved from “core” staff to “flexible” staff.
      • This allows principals to choose whether or not to have a school librarian.  Principals can now use the school librarian allocation for other positions.

As a result of the new Budget Guidelines for 2013, 34 additional schools did not fund school librarians for 2013 bringing the total number of schools without a school librarian to 57.  In 2013, almost 50% of the DC public schools will be without librarians.  Over 16,000 students will be without a school library, if these cuts go through.

 

Research has shown school libraries positively impact teacher effectiveness, increase the likelihood that students will become literate and independent learners, and support at-risk students.  Yet DCPS is choosing to ignore this research, and make deep cuts to its school libraries.

 

The Breakdown

57 schools with no school librarian budgeted for 2013 by Ward.

Ward 1 Ward 2 Ward 3 Ward 4 Ward 5 Ward 6 Ward 7 Ward 8

4

4

0

8

10

10

12

9

57 schools with no school librarians budgeted for 2013 by grade level.
Elementary (63) Education Campus(20) Middle (13) High (18) Alternative (10)
      24             9      7   7       10
Chancellor Henderson is being asked to: 

  • provide a ½ time librarian at schools with 299 or fewer students;
  • move the librarian position to the core staff category; and
  • provide a per student allocation for the libraries dedicated to support collection development and other necessary materials.

 

 

Cutting Libraries During a Recession is Like Cutting Hospitals During a Plague.  Eleanor Crumblehulme